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Classic Books and Videos in the Humanistic Tradition

Economics and the Common Good:
Herman Daly and John B. Cobb, For the Common Good (Redirecting the Economy toward Community, the Environment, and a Sustainable Future), Boston: Beacon Press, 1994

Mark A. Lutz, Economics for the Common Good (Two Centuries of Social Economic Thought in the Humanistic Tradition), New York: Routledge, 1999.

Economics and Human Nature:
Amitai Etzioni, The Moral Dimension (Toward a New Economics), New York: The Free Press, 1988.

Tim Kasser, The High Price of Materialism, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002.

Competition and Growth:
Fred Hirsch, Social Limits to Growth, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1976.

Herman Daly, Beyond Growth, Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996.

Corporate Governance:
David Ellerman, Property and Contract in Economics (The Case for Economic Democracy), Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1992.

Workplace Democracy:
W. Whyte and K. Whyte, Making Mondragon (The Growth and Dynamics of the Worker Cooperative Complex), Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.

David Ellerman, Abolish Human Rentals, YouTube.

John Restakis, Humanizing The Economy, Gabriola Island, Canada, New Society Publishers, 1991.

Economic Systems:
Robert Ozaki, Human Capitalism (The Japanese Enterprise System as a World Model), New York: Kodansa International, 1991.

International Trade:
William Culbertson, International Trade and the Future of the West, Madison, WI: 21st Century Press, 1984.

Globalization:

Dani Rodrik, Has Globalization Gone too Far?, Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics, 1997.

William Greider, One World, Ready or Not (The Manic Logic of Global Capitalism), New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997

Lori Wallach & Michelle Sforza, The WTO (Five Years of Reasons to Resist Corporate Globalization), New York: Seven Stories Press, 1999.

Gandhian Economics:

Ajit Dasgupta, Gandhi’s Economic Thought, New York: Routledge, 1996.

Romesh Diwan and Mark Lutz, ed., Essays in Gandhian Economics, New Delhi: Gandhian Peace Foundation, 1985.

Amritananda Das, Foundations of Gandhian Economics, New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979.

Ecological Sustainability:

Robert Costanza, et al., An Introduction to Ecological Economics, Boca Raton, FL: St. Lucie Press, 1997.

Hermann Daly & Joshua Fairley, Ecological Economics: Principles and Applications, Washington DC: Island Press, 2003

General Interest Audience Books Reflecting a Humanistic Perspective

General Philosophical Background:
The general philosophy underlying human centered social and economic thought is well articulated by the following three books:

E.F. Schumacher, Guide for the Perplexed, New York: Harper & Row, 1977

Mortimer Adler, Six Great Ideas, New York: Collier Macmillan, 1981

Mortimer Adler, The Difference of Man and the Difference It Makes, New York: Fordham University Press, 1993.

Self-Interest and Beyond: 
A critical discussion of self-interest is one of the key ingredients of the humanistic perspective. The following books deal with this essential element:

Ken Lux, Adam Smith's Mistake (How a Moral Philosopher Invented Economics and Ended Morality), Boston: Shambhala, 1990

Barry Schwartz, The Battle for Human Nature (Science, Morality and Modern Life), New York: W.W. Norton, 1986.

Alfie Kohn, The Brighter Side of Human Nature (Altruism, Empathy in Everyday Life), Basic Books, 1989.

The Humanistic Economics Perspective:
In terms of sketching a general outline we recommend:

E.F. Schumacher, Small Is Beautiful (Economics as if People Mattered), New York: Harper & Row, 1973

Herman Daly and John Cobb, For the Common Good (Redirecting the Economy toward Community, the Environment, and a Sustainable Future), Boston: Beacon Press, 1994

Mark Lutz and Kenneth Lux, Humanistic Economics (The New Challenge), New York: Bootstrap Press, 1988

Work:
Work has long been recognized as a foremost catalyst for human development. This central concern manifests clearly in:

E.F. Schumacher, Good Work, New York: Harper & Row, 1979

Richard Sennett, The Corrosion of Character (The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism), New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Ownership:
Workplace issues are very much connected with the question of ownership patterns. Humanistic economists have a strong predisposition toward cooperative worker owned firms. The best example is the giant cooperative corporation at Mondragon in the Basque Region of Spain.

Whyte and Whyte, Making Mondragon (The Growth and Dynamics of the Worker Cooperative Complex), Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.

Marketization of Society and Consumerism:
This is a very broad set of topics, but a good introduction can be found in:

Robert Kuttner, Everything for Sale (The Virtues and Limits of Markets), New York: Alfred Knopf, 1997

Gary Cross, An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America, New York: Columbia, 2000

Alan Durning, How Much Is Enough? The Consumer Society and the Future of the Earth, New York: Norton, 1992

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